How the Supreme Court Could Change LGBTI People’s Lives for Good — or Bad

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11/28/2018

Over the past 20 years, the Supreme Court has established basic rights for gays and lesbians — the right to marry the person you love regardless of sex or gender, the right to private sexual relations, and the right to be able to petition local governments for anti-discrimination protection. It’s impossible to downplay the significance of these decisions in reshaping American life around sexual orientation equality. However, as important as these cases are, they didn’t solve every legal problem for LGBT people. In fact, far from it. Left unresolved is whether there is protection against discrimination for LGBT folks in many other walks of life, such as employment, education, and the military, and whether religion can trump equality. These are pressing issues; for many people, even more pressing than the issues already decided by the Supreme Court.

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