How American Evangelicals Helped Stop Same-Sex Marriage in Cuba

 | 
08/20/2019

Earlier this year, Cuban psychologist Dachelys Valdés Moreno and her American-born wife, Hope, welcomed their baby boy into the world. Although they live in Havana, they opted to give birth—as well as, nine months earlier, undergo the process of IVF—in the U.S. They couldn’t do it at home: The Cuban government still doesn’t recognize same-sex marriage. A year ago, most LGBTQ Cubans would have been eagerly anticipating the expected legalization of same-sex marriage. In July 2018, the Cuban National Assembly proposed a new constitution that included amended language (Article 68) that would make same-sex marriage legal. But that December, the government withdrew the amendment from the draft, largely because of strong backlash from evangelical churches. This means, along with marriage, that assisted reproduction is still only available to heterosexual couples in Cuba; single women are excluded as well.

Share this:

Latest Global News

Added on: 05/29/2024
05/28/2024
As campaigning for the UK general election hots up, concerns are being raised by the trans community on several key issues, including conversion therapy, …
Added on: 05/29/2024
05/28/2024
A new report details a wave of attacks on gay men in France carried out by young perpetrators using hook-up apps to lure their …
Added on: 05/29/2024
05/28/2024
As the LGBTQ+ community continues to face discriminatory legislation across the country, there are also a number of active court cases making their way …

Explore LGBTQ+ Issues

Added on: 05/29/2024
As the LGBTQ+ community continues to face discriminatory legislation across the country, there are also a number of active court cases making their way …
Added on: 05/28/2024
The federal government in 2020 and 2023 changed who it said could safely donate organs and blood, reducing the restrictions on men who have …
Added on: 05/27/2024
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Fuller Theological Seminary, an evangelical school in Pasadena, California, is deliberating whether to become more open to LGBTQ+ students who …